Stubborn Redhorse

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RyanD19972
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Stubborn Redhorse
<p>Hello all,&nbsp;</p> <p>I have finally found an area with a large population of redhorse suckers. &nbsp;I have been fishing for them witn red worms but they just will not bite. Anyone have any tips? &nbsp;Thanks in advance!</p>
tom
tom's picture
redhorse

Try a slip sinker rig fished on the faster side of current seams. Bites can be VERY subtle, just 2-3 little taps and then nothing. half of a nightcrawler threaded onto the hook should do the trick, I've noticed they seem to like the tail end better. Use sticky sharp hooks,  octopus hooks work well, no bigger than size 2. A shorter leader is better, especially in current. If they're present they will find your bait quickly,

TonyS
TonyS's picture
Redhorse?

Can you see the Redhorse?  Do you see them actually feeding?  Or just sitting there?  What is the spot like?


Typically the where and the when is more important than anything else.  Redworms will work fine.  Avoid hooks that are too large as this can make things more difficult.  I use #8 hooks more often than not, you could go larger but there usually isn't a need

SomewhereDownstream
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Redhorse

I'd give it a shot at night.

SomewhereDownstream

RyanD19972
RyanD19972's picture
Thanks for the help guys,

Thanks for the help guys, TonyS you asked about the spot.... It's kind of a strange spot, it's a very sluggish oxbow lake.  We catch bowfin and bullhead there quite often but there isn't much current and we fish off of a dock.  Since we fish off of a dock, the fish are very skittish and seem to spook very easily.  Unfortunately, this dock is the only place where we can realistically fish due to the surrounding vegetation.  I have caught one there before but it was kind of an accidental catch while I was fishing for bait to use for bowfin.  In the south suckers aren't quite as easy to come by, which is why I really wan to capitalize on this spot.  

RyanD19972
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And yeah they are feeding,

And yeah they are feeding, but they seem to pass right over our baits. 

philaroman
philaroman's picture
couple ideas:
  1. downsize your tackle -- 6 lb. or thinner leader; #8 or smaller high-end hook
  2. try "local" baits -- i.e., from the actual lake/banks you fish
  3. try vegetarian baits -- corn, dough, bread, etc.
  4. if legal, chum very small amounts frequently (every 20-30 min. if no action; every 10-15 min. if there is)
  5. for best bite detection, minimal splash on the cast & most precise use of chum, try a skinny fixed float (quill, Thill Shy Bite, etc.)...  bait should still be within 6" of bottom!
  6. DON'T ROCK THE DOCK !!!

P.E.T.A. sucks!!!  Plants are living things, too -- they're just easier to catch!

SomewhereDownstream
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Stillwater suckers

I fish for suckers pretty often in a little pond, and the best thing I've fished there is a tiny(size twelve or smaller) ice fly tipped with a piece of meal worm or wax worm on four or six pound test. I suspend it under a teeny little bobber similar to those used for great lakes steelhead; I think it's an e-z float, but I'm not really sure. I tend to experiment with the depth setting and have caught them everywhere from nearly on the bottom to just below the surface.

I don't know if this will apply to your water, but it's worth a shot.

SomewhereDownstream

J Dunfee
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Message me man.

Message me man.