Micro Baits...

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kernel j
Micro Baits...
<p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa">Might as well have a micro-bait thread, anything and everything, including artificials.&nbsp; Could be interesting to see how it develops, especially with regard to regions and seasons. &nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa; min-height: 15.0px">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa">I like the worm and use it on occasion, typically as in the pic below often incorporating some tooling to get the job done.&nbsp; Darn tough bait, conveniently obtainable all winter long at Wally World.</p> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> <img alt="" src="http://i977.photobucket.com/albums/ae254/kernelj/tweezbait.jpg " /></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa">Although I find the waxworm/beemoth to be highly productive for larger chubs and shiners, it proves way big even when diced up for the smaller quarry.&nbsp; Despite it&#39;s nutrient value, the darters don&#39;t seem to find the amorphous look of the smaller pieces at all appealing.&nbsp; However, the grub&#39;s plumbing is a bit different story...these guys have snazzy innards!</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa">Behold, the waxie&#39;s lovely &quot;inner glassworm&quot; with a head thrown in to show scale.</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa"><img alt="" src="http://i977.photobucket.com/albums/ae254/kernelj/glassworms2.jpg " /></p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa"><img alt="" src="http://i977.photobucket.com/albums/ae254/kernelj/glasshook.jpg " /></p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa">No, they are not easy to get on a hook, but once on they&#39;re tougher than one might suspect.&nbsp; Can&#39;t say I use them often, just something to keep in the bag of tricks if needed.&nbsp; Potentially the ultimate finesse bait for some species somewhere.&nbsp; Here&#39;s one on a #24, scraps of processing carnage visible in the background.&nbsp; Hook eye tool is used to push the glassworm on once it&#39;s pricked dead center, just stick the point through the eye and it pushes the worm up the shank.&nbsp; (rodbuilders..think GripPusher)</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa">My current favorite baits?&nbsp; Easy, free, and plentiful...</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa"><img alt="" src="http://i977.photobucket.com/albums/ae254/kernelj/summatime.jpg " /></p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa">Yep, a proud participant and official member of the Freebaiter&#39;s Guild with a strong preference toward the caddis larvae seen above.&nbsp; This is one tough bait that can withstand the mauling given it by the swarms of unintentional shiners, easily long enough to actually hook intendeds.&nbsp; Hands down the hardest larva to steal, not surprising considering some spin underwater webs and glue pebbles together.&nbsp; Even the freeliving varieties are good on a hook, though not quite as rugged as a net spinner or case builder.&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa; min-height: 15.0px">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa">Depending on how they&#39;re hooked, it&#39;s not unusual to have a fairly good run on one bait in terms of numbers.&nbsp; I prefer to thread the larva as seen below.&nbsp; On the smaller #32&#39;s, one can go with either proportionately smaller baits or trim from the head of a larger one.&nbsp; The latter option will give a longer lasting bait as the bigger bugs are a bit tougher in tissue. &nbsp;No matter if it&#39;s just the abdomen on a #32, the fish <span style="text-decoration: underline">know</span> what it is.</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa"><img alt="" src="http://i977.photobucket.com/albums/ae254/kernelj/Thumbcaddis.jpg " /></p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa">Above is an example of a nape-of-neck entry point, below is an under-the-chin job.&nbsp; Both get the benefit of a durable bait which is readily recognized as common forage.</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa"><img alt="" src="http://i977.photobucket.com/albums/ae254/kernelj/dueeast.jpg " /></p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666">A bit on obtaining these critters, type of environment and nature of the larval haunts.&nbsp; Pic is of me scroungin&#39; up some larvae in one of my local flows, great variety here so one can be choosy as to size and specie.</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666"><img alt="" src="http://i977.photobucket.com/albums/ae254/kernelj/pickinspeg.jpg " /></p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666">Do note the classic form displayed above.&nbsp; Good foot spacing, butt low, and an &quot;busy looking&quot; forward lean can make one look more like a biologist and less like the average tresspasser.&nbsp; Perfectly acceptable to drop the pelvis even lower and partially submerge it in order to enjoy the pleasent cooling effects in the summer heat.&nbsp; In Guildspeak, this is called <i>groining the riffle</i> and is highly recommended to stave off heat exhaustion or to simply increase one&#39;s comfort level. &nbsp; Just mind your balance and don&#39;t tip over backward.&nbsp; (yes, I have done this before and lost all the caddis)</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa">Here&#39;s a bit of turnstone technique for any aspirants out there, it&#39;s called &quot;cupping&quot; a rock.</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa"><img alt="" src="http://i977.photobucket.com/albums/ae254/kernelj/disclaim.jpg " /></p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa">While the fingers hold the rock, a cupped palm provides a nice reservoir for preferred larva while allowing the unwanted to wiggle off the rock and hit the creek.&nbsp; Some runs have many clingers and swimmers, hold the rock over dry land while picking caddis and there&#39;s a dozen non-bait nymphs dead on dry land.&nbsp; They may not make it back to the bottom in some runs, but at least they&#39;ll be fish food if cupping is done over water. &nbsp; Nice to gather a bunch for starters and reserve, when fishing in rocky runs and riffles I often rebait by grabbing a rock and then stashing 2-3 extras in the pillbox.&nbsp; Keeps a good supply for flat water sections where larvae is sparser. &nbsp;Sometimes caddis fall into the palm, most times they need to be picked out of the lairs. &nbsp;Running the finger over the pebble mounds will uncover many baits as the pebbles are dislodged and the lair disassembled. &nbsp;Find one that feels like it&#39;s put together with epoxy? &nbsp;Leave it, it&#39;s a pupa and not very durable as bait. &nbsp;Cool lookin&#39; bug in that stage, but it&#39;s mostly fly and comes apart like one when pecked at.&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa; min-height: 15.0px">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa">Small nets could be used in place of hand picking, but be forwarned...these little crits will grab and cling tenaciously to anything they can.&nbsp; You&#39;ll be fightin&#39; with &#39;em in a net.</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666; background-color: #fafafa; min-height: 15.0px">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 2.0px 0.0px; line-height: 20.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #666666">Thus far, the above stuff what I use most of the time in my waters yet it only represents but a few of the possible options.&nbsp; Anyone use paste baits?&nbsp; Artificials (fly or rind)?&nbsp; Rice?&nbsp; Quinoa?&nbsp; Let&#39;s see it...</p> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> </div> <p>&nbsp;</p>
TheHugbot
TheHugbot's picture
very nice pics, a bait I have

very nice pics, a bait I have had good success with recently is bloodworm I ish them singly or in bunches on a tanago hook. if you look at some of the pictures of minnows on my blog you will see just how irresisable they are to micros! they stop moving soon ater being hooked but that doesn't stop them from attracting fish. 

 

most f the ones I use are between 5-12mm long, this is a larger one.

 

TheHugbot
TheHugbot's picture
I have also done well with

I have also done well with maggots, over here you can buy them in all sorts of sizes and colours, I prefer the red coloured ones either whole for larger fish such as ruffe, minnows or gudgeon or in smaller peices for sticklebacks etc, I have even caught fish on a scrap of maggot skin!

CM_Stewart
I have used rice (about 1/8

I have used rice (about 1/8 of a grain), size 26 flies, a tiny piece of worm and a Japanese gel bait (from a tube). All caught fish. All things considered, the tube is the most convenient (for me - no bait shops anywere around me) but a bit of worm seems to work just as well and stays on the hook better. 

TenkaraBum