Is there a size limit to slinkies? What's biggest you've made/used?

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Gunnar
Gunnar's picture
Is there a size limit to slinkies? What's biggest you've made/used?

It's been a couple years since I cooked up slinkies, and I don't remember the weight of the biggest ones I've made, but they were 3/4 inch thick, filled with 36 caliber lead balls, probably 5" long. I am about to make a bunch and was thinking of making some really heavy ones. Wondering if there is a point where they are too heavy to be effective in terms of non-snagging. I figure once they get past a certain length they might actually be more likely to snag in certain situations, so I plan to go with larger lead in larger rope to get weight without length. Not sure what's the thickest meltable rope or the biggest musket balls I'll be able to find.

Corey
Corey's picture
I'm not sure

I have made a bunch with mountain-climbing rope and .45 caliber musket balls. They don't seem to get snagged, but in heavy current, they don't catch on the bottom like a pyramid weight does. I've got a big bucket of them, and at the time I thought they would be the answer to my prayers. But it's hard to say exactly when you'll need them, and they are really hard to haul around on your adventures and excursions. So whenever I need them, they are at home, and whenever I don't need them, I have what seems like ten pounds of them in my tackle bag.

TonyS
TonyS's picture
I find I like slinkies most u

I find I like slinkies most up to about an 1oz.  Above that I can take them or leave them, if I actually need the sticking power of a 2oz+ sinker I usually go for something that grabs better.  My two favorites for heavy sinkers are pyramids for sand and fine gravel and coin/disc/pancake style for coarse gravel, cobble, etc.  The pancake sinkers with an eye hold well on rocky bottoms but I wide enough that they don't snag as bad as pyramids.

 

I do have some slinkies up to the 3-4oz range.  I made them with hocky laces and 1/2-3/4oz egg sinkers.  To date I've only really used them to pin big, live Flathead baits down in rocky areas.  I think they might be ok in very select situations otherwise but thus far I haven't hit a situation where they were the real answer.  Maybe in combo with a planer board for swift cobble chutes would work well.  Even then I think a 2oz slinky might be better as a 3-4oz might be struggle for some boards, I dunno

Gunnar
Gunnar's picture
I have the same problem with

I have the same problem with big pyramids and such. Always either get tired of carrying them and leave them behind right before I need them, or haul tons of them all over for no good reason. A lot of the time I like that slinkies don't stick in place but just keep the bait moving intermittently. 

 

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TonyS
TonyS's picture
That slow drag through the ru

That slow drag through the run with a slinky can be killer and is overlooked.  I'll use 1-2oz slinkies at times for that, for whatever reason I haven't come accross an awesome situation for using 3oz+ slinkies like that.  l think Channel Cats in fast rocky water, drifting a heavy slinky and cutbait would be deadly.  All my biggest Channels have come from fast water but usually from gravel, where a slinky is unnessary 

TonyS
TonyS's picture
I should note I do use 2oz sl

I should note I do use 2oz slinkies a lot in some of places where Rivers turn up on a regular basis