Quillback question

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RoughFish
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Quillback question

I have found some info on quillback location nearby but only a picture of them and the creeks name. There is one low head dam on said creek. Should I be searching below this dam or above it (headwaters?) for these fish? I have found zero information on whether these fish make a migratory run for spawning or if they typically inhabit small ranges all year. As far as technique and habitat I've done a good bit of reading but any tips are appreciated. The body of water is sugar creek, IN.

philaroman
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I'd try below the dam at most

I'd try below the dam at most times, but if you locate them in very early Spring, then they disappear -- go above (esp. if your dam has a ladder, or gets submerged in high flows)...  then, vice versa

in my home waters (lower Delaware R. Basin), I'm pretty sure they do a Spring run upstream to spawn in faster current, over cleaner sand/gravel bottom...  don't know how good they are at getting over obstacles, but they seem to use ladders more readily than Shad/Herring & Stripers, for which said ladders were built

this Forum probably has more info on the "HOW", than all the other sources combined  yes  don't miss the article & comments that follow:

http://www.roughfish.com/content/fishing-carpsuckers-quillback-river-and-highfin

P.E.T.A. sucks!!!  Plants are living things, too -- they're just easier to catch!

philaroman
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P.S.

I think Quillbacks migrate a little later than White Suckers, but long before Carp become active  [ for anglers at different lattitudes, that should be more useful than trying to figure out actual time of year & factor in weather/climate variations ]

P.E.T.A. sucks!!!  Plants are living things, too -- they're just easier to catch!

kernel j
Realistically speaking...

No need to worry about above or below aforementioned damn which I assume is Crawfordsville.   There aren't many places on this creek where carpsuckers are scarce, it's kinda like most any other trib of the Wabash in that way.

 

RoughFish
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First off, thanks for the

First off, thanks for the replies fellas. Of course I've read that bit on them Philaroman, that's the single best collection of info on them on the entire internet. As for tributaries of the Wabash near myself (west/east fork white and tribs ), I have not found any locations that are shallow enough or clear enough anytime of the year to target these fish well. I was relying on the clarity of sugar creek to be able to sight fish them or at least to give me faith they are present. I'm glad to hear they are throughout the whole system. You mentioned carpsucker though, are there river and highfin there as well? Unfortunately the DNR survey of the creek only mentions common game species and almost nothing about what roughfish were recorded.

RoughFish
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Found and caught! Thanks

Found and caught! Thanks fellas, thanks roughfish.com. Kernal J you were abolutely correct, in the very first pool I approached there we lots of carpsucker.....both quillback and highfin (I think) and maybe a river (the biggest I saw) but he disappeared quickly. Size 16 daiichi with tiny piece of worm, 4lb fluoro.

kernel j
Nice catch!  I saw it on the

Nice catch!  I saw it on the main page and was quite happy to read how you did it.  First rule of carpsucker fishing is actually don't dance...at least in Indiana creeks.  If one can stay still and not step or grind gravel under their feet, the carpsuckers will almost kiss your boots.  You appear to understand this often overlooked aspect of stream fishing quite well although it can be really hard to do for longer periods of time.  Stillness gets kindly rewarded.

 

Yeah, the creek you found is a state treasure in terms of publicity so don't worry about having mentioned it.  A canoe parade in warm seasons, many smallmouth guides promote it, average anglers have umpteen blogs and videos of recreating on it.  Sometimes you'll get warned about mentioning by name a waterway, this one is not of that nature.  Last hogsh*t spill killed alot of it, it bounced back, now everyone raves about it publicly and promotes the value in many ways.   It has many champions, often in major publications, which in some cases is far safer than secrecy in the cornbelt.  You're gonna like this creek, it has much to offer and don't overlook the Redhorse while everyone else is obsessing over the smallmouth fishing. 

 

Regarding your question on species, all three and maybe a suspecies of Quillback known as the Central Carpsucker which kinda makes four.  If I can ever catch enough to care of such detail, I'll be sure to let all know.  Thus far, just catching any of them is a joyous surprise.

 

Again, congrats.

 

 

RoughFish
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Thanks Kernel, I've hiked the

Thanks Kernel, I've hiked the trails here and used the canoe liveries my entire life but until this trip I had never fished it. Knowing how crowded it gets with floaters etc I must have figured it wasn't worth the trouble. ( Long before I lifelisted or fished any season other than summer.) I've never heard of the central carpsucker you mentioned, are they an undescribed species?