White sucker eggs

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sjmaveal
White sucker eggs

I have just caught some really nice sucker and I'm planning on smoking them. The thing is they are all female, so I have a lot of eggs. I was going to try to use them for bait, but I'm curious if I could eat them as well? Kind of like walleye and perch eggs?

Sara

Susquehannock
Susquehannock's picture
Sucker eggs

I've heard that suck over eggs are alright, but I haven't actually eaten them myself. Maybe you should ask Gunnar; he seems to be the sucker expert around here.

Susquehannock

philaroman
philaroman's picture
same as carp roe

1) you can empty the sacks into a jar & salt-cure in the fridge to get something close to Tarama or Tobiko

  • !!! must be VERY FRESH !!! -- iced upon capture or processed VERY promptly in cold weather 
  • use Kosher/Sea/plain salt -- NOT IODIZED!!! 

2) you can bread & pan-fry the entire sacks -- the trick is to catch the 30-second window between undercooked & overcooked...  actually male gonads (aka, milt) are better for frying -- pretty close to fried oysters

P.E.T.A. sucks!!!  Plants are living things, too -- they're just easier to catch!

Gunnar
Gunnar's picture
Redhorse caviar

First, around here I'm not the sucker expert. This site is crawling with them, though. 

 

I experimented with some redhorse eggs a couple years ago. Wrote it up here: 

http://moxostoma.com/state-record-shorthead-redhorse-caviar/

 

I don't know how white sucker eggs compare to shorthead eggs, but if they're as tiny it'll be tough to get good texture cooked or preserved as caviar. However, there must be ways of salting and drying them that would yield something cool. 

 

According to the Encyclopedia of Fish Cookery by AJ McClane (1977) (totally worth finding used online, and usually really cheap, as it's got everything), white sucker roe is good eating:

Both the roe and white roe of suckers are edible and are considered a delicacy among mountain folk in the southern US. They are prepared like mullet roe, rolled in cornmeal and fried. Another way is to fry the roe about half done, then scramble with eggs.

The roe section of the index is more than one column. One thing that's mentioned for several types I looked at is that you have to act fast: get them on ice as fast as possible, keep cold, eat soon. (White roe is milt, if anyone's wondering.)

 


Redhorse ID cheatsheets & sucker obsession: moxostoma.com


2017 so far: 13 days, 13 species, 2 lifers. 2016: 48/33/5 2015: 51/43/11 2014: 43/49/16

philaroman
philaroman's picture
cool link, thanks

cool link, thanks

if you got to the "deep-fried sand" stage, you overcooked:

  • keep the roe sacks intact
  • dust in flour or starch (rice is best, IMO) -- cooking time is too short for cornmeal
  • use premium oil -- I like grapeseed or sunflower
  • rather than deepfry, pan-fry on med. heat so you can finger-test firmness after you flip -- it takes practice
  • seriously, the window between raw center & overcooked unpalatable grittiness is mighty brief -- maybe 30 sec. w/ bigger carp roe sacks; 10-20 sec. w/ smaller sucker roe sacks (milt is much more forgiving w/ regard to cooking time)

P.E.T.A. sucks!!!  Plants are living things, too -- they're just easier to catch!

Gunnar
Gunnar's picture
Even the uncooked eggs were

Even the uncooked eggs were sand-like. I know the outermost ones were too cooked, but if you look at the photos you can see that others weren't. The eggs in general were just too small to really work for me. I love eating fish eggs, and I'll try these again if I ever happen to have some, but so far they're not high on my list.

 


Redhorse ID cheatsheets & sucker obsession: moxostoma.com


2017 so far: 13 days, 13 species, 2 lifers. 2016: 48/33/5 2015: 51/43/11 2014: 43/49/16